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an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
on in the macro environment environment. i like the you have to pick your spots and be very aware what is going on around you. melissa: panel, thanks for your insight. we really appreciate it. >> thank you. melissa: coming up on "money" with have exclusive interview with the co-owner of the boston celtics what he is doing to make fans are safe at the game. this will change his way of doing business. oil falls to the lowest level in a month. we'll tell you why. plus what effect will the boston bombing have on the price of crude. stay right here. a lot more "money" straight ahead. we went out and asked people a simple question: how old ithe oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like
in a diversionary environment? >> obviously the world is very dynamic. we have the report from china that their growth was not as robust as expected. economic act two that he is not quite as robust to support this type of equity market. there are concerns that confidence is fading on the u.s. federal reserve monetary policy as well. >> i think that is part of it. i think what you observe in a marketplace is at the asian market is still very interested in gold. they are very active in this cold environment. earlier this year, the indians were a little bit challenged. this clearly opened up the window for them. lori: let's talk about some of these gold mining stocks. a lot of people were concerned about the gold mining companies. getting back to your discussion with me on production costs versus -- do you think they are on a more bullish trajectory? >> i think we are getting a realignment that is a positive for the industry. lori: would you put new money into shares? >> not a position for us. lori: i appreciate your take. thank you. melissa: will the deadly boston terror attack change
or the environment around the bomb. >> but the bomb may have hit other metal objects that then splintered apart? >> this is what i'm hearing although i certainly don't know that for a fact. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a forward surgical team or combat support hospital. >> well, again, we know there is heroism, large and small at all times at mass general, and we thank you so much for joining us. i know you've got at least five surgeries today. we'll let you go back to work. >> thank you very much. >>> and coming up next here, a nation on edge. other cities in america, after the tragedy in boston. and chantix helped me quit. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions whi
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
slices so everybody can eat. you need to get more pizza. in order to do that you need an environment good for business. and i think they have all lost sight of that. it's not about taxes, redistribution. >> are you looking for a quick fix? >> there's no quick fix to this. there's a very difficult fix to this and things if both sides will have to do that are uncomfortable in the short run. lying about it isn't going to make it better. by saying social security, medicare, medicaid aren't in trouble, is not going to make it better. >> working so well. >> despicable. >> bob, thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> j.j., rick, see you soon. thank you. >> always a pleasure. >> our guest host will be with us the rest of the show. >> very excited this morning. >> tell us what you really think. coming up, more on goldman sack's earnings report. beating the streets expectations by 40%. up next, reaction from financial sector analysts. the one and only dick bove. ♪ ♪ the new blackberry z10 with time shift and blackberry balance. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.co
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
measures that he's undertaken. for example he's been a little bit good on the environment where i think the latin left has been traditionally quite weak. >> i think he's incomparable. i don't think there's another leader like him or has pen in a long time. his charisma was off the charts. that's not necessarily a bad thing. the left has to learn how to administer. in terms of the 20th century of latin american history maybe juan perone or a few leaders here and there but i think chavez was really one of a kind. >> i'd rather we not have either a fidel or a chavez in the future. i think we're beyond that. what's interesting, for example, about someone like lula who was charismatic and successful and everything he has tended to fade away. he apparently is not running for his third term. a couple years from now. >> he's also ill. his successor is not doing a bad job. little by little what we're getting over in latin america and it's a good thing is this charismatic leaders some of whom are more successful and more attractive than others. one can like. one can dislike. those are personal qu
may have already been present in the environment. in fact, we won't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing the fbi initiated a command post that was assigned to the jttf. intelligent analyst and analysts and personnel from every agency associated with jttf and many others on their own including boston pd and mass state police, more than 1,000 law enforcement officers across many agencies had been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began canvasing sources, reviewing government and public source data bases, and conducting interviews with eyewitnesses and others to determine who is responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically, carefully, yet with a sense of urgency. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of noon today. many of which have already been reviewed, analyzed, and vette
we can eliminate other factors which may have already been present in the environment. in fact, we won't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene, yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing, the fbi initiated a command post. those assigned to the jttf, intelligence analysts and other personnel from every state, local and federal government agency associated with the jttf, and many others on their own, including boston pd and mass state police, more than 1,000 law enforcement officers across many agencies had been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began canvassing sources, reviewing government and public source databases and conducting interviews with eyewitnesss and others to determine who was responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically, carefully, yet with a sense of urgency. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not generically, but so specific you can relate that back to
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st century. much on thee very u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. the second reason this will be terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our great experts. ted. , weseries of speakers today will have first ambassador med
whether this came from the environment, right? but it is not. >> i can tell you, as a person who has done trauma surgery, it can be difficult to tell sometimes when you're actually taking some of the shrapnel, wear exactly did it come from. but now they're saying without a doubt, we asked a few times, that there were nails, carpenter nails specifically and, quote, bb-like metal within some of these patients. and so they -- they know for sure it came from the explosive device. this is a doctor saying that based on their medical examination. this wasn't just debris that was lying around. >> what about also quickly in terms of the amputations, i was hearing one of the doctors saying last night, some of the patients were coming to them very injured, bleeding and saying, take whatever you need, i want to be alive. that has to be tough for a doctor, though. >> these are i think heart breaking decisions. it is a -- you can make the decision fairly quickly if that's going to be the best course of action. >> life or death. >> if you don't do the amputation, sometimes it can mean infection, that ca
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in a post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse or cruel treatment when those techniques were applied by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticizes another nation for engaging in torture and then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques like waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision approving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in its opinion it relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture, but also on factual representations about how the tec
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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